Sake etiquette – SAKEMON

Sake etiquette

Sake etiquette

Posted on by Sakemon Team

Sake etiquette

Sake etiquette

Drinking Sake is fun, but little people know that there is a proper etiquette when drinking sake. This is a way of drinking more appropriate, and it is nothing formal. Knowing them beforehand will greatly help when you have a nomikai(Sake meeting) with a group of Japanese.

 

 

 

  - Receiving

  You may hold the cup gently in one hand and support it with another. There is no typical hand you should use on this process. Take a small sip before putting the cup on the table, as it might overflow when it is full.

Check if your companion has an empty cup and fill them if there is none. If someone offers you Sake, drink the remaining to give some space for the new sake. However, you do not have to finish all of it.

 

  - Pouring

  When holding the tokkuri[bottle], you must hold it with your right hand, and support the bottom with your left hand. MAKE SURE that your right hand is not facing down at any time.

Even if you are pouring to the person at your right side, your right hand should be at the top of the tokkuri. When offering sake to others, check that if their cup is less than one-third full.

 

 

 

  - Handing the tokkuri?

  Since the tokkuri is not visible in the inside, it is hard to check how much sake is left. Do not, however, shake the tokkuri to check if there is any left. Especially if it is warm sake, shaking it will cool the temperature down.

Try not to peek into the tokkuri by holding them upwards. It is poor manners to check the contents with your own eyes.

 And do not, at all times, drink straight from the tokkuri. Drinking straight from the tokkuri is like drinking wine out of the bottle.

Even if there is little content left in a tokkuri, please do not mix them with another. Sake is a type of alcohol which is vastly enjoyed with the original scent of rice. When you mix them up, however, it gets jumbled up and may bring up an awful taste.

These tips are just some manners that are not always compulsory. However, knowing them might help when you have important business meetings with a Japanese customer. Hope it may help all of you in the near future!

Sake etiquette

Drinking Sake is fun, but little people know that there is a proper etiquette when drinking sake. This is a way of drinking more appropriate, and it is nothing formal. Knowing them beforehand will greatly help when you have a nomikai(Sake meeting) with a group of Japanese.

 

 

 

  - Receiving

  You may hold the cup gently in one hand and support it with another. There is no typical hand you should use on this process. Take a small sip before putting the cup on the table, as it might overflow when it is full.

Check if your companion has an empty cup and fill them if there is none. If someone offers you Sake, drink the remaining to give some space for the new sake. However, you do not have to finish all of it.

 

  - Pouring

  When holding the tokkuri[bottle], you must hold it with your right hand, and support the bottom with your left hand. MAKE SURE that your right hand is not facing down at any time.

Even if you are pouring to the person at your right side, your right hand should be at the top of the tokkuri. When offering sake to others, check that if their cup is less than one-third full.

 

 

 

  - Handing the tokkuri?

  Since the tokkuri is not visible in the inside, it is hard to check how much sake is left. Do not, however, shake the tokkuri to check if there is any left. Especially if it is warm sake, shaking it will cool the temperature down.

Try not to peek into the tokkuri by holding them upwards. It is poor manners to check the contents with your own eyes.

 And do not, at all times, drink straight from the tokkuri. Drinking straight from the tokkuri is like drinking wine out of the bottle.

Even if there is little content left in a tokkuri, please do not mix them with another. Sake is a type of alcohol which is vastly enjoyed with the original scent of rice. When you mix them up, however, it gets jumbled up and may bring up an awful taste.

These tips are just some manners that are not always compulsory. However, knowing them might help when you have important business meetings with a Japanese customer. Hope it may help all of you in the near future!